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Top 7 Amazing Edamame Substitute Will Make You Surprised

A fiber-rich, meat-free recipe with enough nutrition should always have amazing beans, from black beans to Edamame. However, Edamame is not the most popular bean type in the world, so you might not be able to find them in your local store.

If that case happens to you, what Edamame substitute can you find for your recipe? The answer lies in my list below!

What Kind Of Bean Is Edamame?

Edamame can sound strange at first to many people, but it is quite a familiar food in the bean family. The name“Edamame” is a Japanese name for premature soybeans. It is a popular type of bean in Japan that used to be sold with stems. So, what type of bean is Edamame?

As it is an immature soybean, Edamame peas have a small size and round shape of soybeans. However, instead of having a yellow color of ripe soybean, fresh Edamame has bright green skin wrapped in its pod.

In terms of flavor, there is also a difference between soybean and Edamame.

Edamame tends to have a sweet and nutty taste due to the high sucrose and amino acid concentration when they are maturing. Perhaps because of their premature stage, Edamame, like the black bean, also has many nutritional benefits like a huge source of protein that is perfect for a healthy diet. It is also low in the glycemic index to boost your energy.

Moreover, you can find many dietary fibers, vitamins, and minerals inside these tiny beans.

Edamame is usually found in frozen batches in many U.S. stores. Frozen Edamame is a great ingredient for boiling, pan-frying, and steaming dishes. You can sprinkle some salt and serve them in salads, stews, and noodles. In addition, you can find them as snacks in many Japanese restaurants.

7 Amazing Vegetables Used As A Edamame Substitute

Bean Is Edamame

Edamame is such a tasty bean for your fiber-rich diet. However, it is not always available in your local store. Let’s find out what Edamame substitute you can find for your simple recipe with Edamame:

1. Mukimames

At the top of the list, Mukimames is a strange name, but it has the same root as Edamame. Mukimames is another name for Edamame which are premature soybeans stripped from their pods and sold in small bean batches. When comparing Mukimame vs Edamame, you’ll find they have a lot in common.

The Mukimames have a bright green color and small shape of immature soybeans. They have a firm texture with a fresh and nutty flavor. You can easily find them in the frozen section in plastic freezer bags. Unlike Edamame, they are good to boil on the stovetop or steam in the bag right away without many process steps.

2. Fava Beans

One of the best substitute beans for Edamame is a long-lasting bean type called Fava bean or Broad beans. Dating back to 6,000 B.C.E., fava beans have their mark in many parts of the world: Europe, Africa, America, and the Middle Eastern.

As popular as they are, when comparing fava beans vs Edamame, these great beans also have a similar deep flavor and texture.

Like Edamame, fava beans are grown in green pods. Their shape is slightly oval, with light green skin. When being cooked, fresh fava beans have a mild and creamy texture. Their flavor is a combination of slight bitterness, sweetness, nuttiness, and a slight cheesy undertone.

You can find two versions of fava beans: fresh and dried fava beans. The dried ones have less flavor with a grainy texture.

You can use fava beans in many Edamame recipes like stews, soups, and salads.

3. Garbanzo Beans

One of the best substitute beans for Edamame is a long-lasting bean type called Fava bean or Broad beans. Dating back to 6,000 B.C.E., fava beans have their mark in many parts of the world: Europe, Africa, America, and the Middle Eastern.

As popular as they are, when comparing fava beans vs Edamame, these great beans also have a similar deep flavor and texture.

Like Edamame, fava beans are grown in green pods. Their shape is slightly oval, with light green skin. When being cooked, fresh fava beans have a mild and creamy texture. Their flavor is a combination of slight bitterness, sweetness, nuttiness, and a slight cheesy undertone.

You can find two versions of fava beans: fresh and dried fava beans. The dried ones have less flavor with a grainy texture.

You can use fava beans in many Edamame recipes like stews, soups, and salads.

4. Garbanzo Beans

Garbanzo bean or chickpea is another great substitute for Edamame because of their texture. The flavor of Garbanzo is quite versatile which can be used to substitute ranch style beans as well. However, Garbanzo beans can have a beige color that is different from Edamame green skin, so you might consider putting them in salads.

For soups and stews, Garbanzo is a great source of protein and fiber. These beans can add more flavor layers to your dish with their earthy, nutty, and dynamic flavor. You will find it creamy and light grainy when taking a bite that fills your mouth like Edamame.

5. Sugar Snap Peas

This type of pea with a funky name is a great Edamame alternative because of its similar look. But are snap peas the same as Edamame? Actually, they are two different beans. Snap peas are a combination of garden peas and snow peas. When comparing sugar snap peas vs Edamame, snap peas are great to substitute Edamame in savory dishes because of the similarity in flavor.

These snap peas are sold in green pods with a round and thick pod wall. Like Edamame, sugar snap peas are green and small with a distinctive sweet flavor.

Comparing snap peas vs Edamame when cooked, these sweet peas can be juicier and crunchier, giving a “snap” sound when you eat them. You can use them as a snack like Edamame or cook them in stews and soups.

6. Lima Bean

Is Edamame the same as lima beans in terms of flavor and texture?

If you love the creamy and soft texture of roasted Edamame, you should take a look at Lima beans. Also known as buttery beans, this bean type, containing a rich protein and fiber content, has a bigger size than a small soybean. They can be green at a premature stage, then white at their maturity.

Lima beans have a regal and earthy taste that you might not find in many bean types. When crushing it between your teeth, the buttery and velvety consistency fills in your mouth that makes them a potential Edamame replacement.

Because of its texture, you can use them in a meat-free diet, soups, and stews with other vegetables.

7. Green beans

Lastly, if you look for a type of bean with a green look, you can also use green beans for your roasted Edamame dishes. They are normally available in their green and yellow skin.

Fresh green beans tend to have a firm texture that you can snap in half. If the beans get slimy, you should store them immediately in the fridge. Green beans have a bright green color that you can use for salads. They are crispy and starchy, which is preferable for steaming and sauteing recipes.

FAQs

Fava Beans

 1. Snow Peas Vs Edamame: Are They The Same?

Snow peas and soybeans are legumes with edible seeds inside the pods. This fact makes them hard to distinguish for some people. However, these two legumes come from different plants and habitats. The hard peas also have a crispier texture than Edamame.

2. Can You Use Edamame As A Broad Bean Substitute?

As we have known, Broad beans or Garbanzo beans have a similar distinct flavor to Edamame. Therefore, there is no reason why you can’t use Edamame to substitute for Broad beans. Edamame is great for many soups and stews recipes asking for Broad beans.

Conclusion

Edamame is a green pod bean with delicious flavor and texture. However, they are not always available in many countries. If your recipes ask for Edamame, you can always look at my Edamame substitute to choose the best ingredient for your fiber-rich recipes.

Kevin Richard
 

Hi all! I’m Kevin. I spend plenty of time in the kitchen every day because I love cooking healthy and delicious foods for my family and friends. Cooking gives me a chance to be creative and fun. It’s also one of the most meaningful ways to express my love and take care of my little family.

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