How Long Do Clementines Last? – How To Preserve Clementines At Its Best?

If you are a fan of citrus fruits such as mangoes, oranges, lemons, etc., these fruits are abundant in vitamin C and minerals, which are responsible for your body’s beauty and health. Other than those popular fruits, clementines also provide a lot of beneficial nutrients for humans as well.

But, if you don’t store them properly, you would waste a basket of healthy minerals. So, how long do clementines last, and how can we store them so that they last for a long time? Every question about clementines’ storage will be given detailedly in this article!

How Long Do Clementines Last

How Long Do Clementines Last At Room Temperature

Like any other kind of fruit, clementines can stay at room temperature. However, due to environmental circumstances, clementines have an expiration when being put in the normal temperature situation.

Of course, clementines will not be rotten right away in the normal temp like when cheesecake sits out in the room temperature. They will last for one week if you decide to store clementines in the cabinet or in the kitchen’s fruit basket.

Then, you might think about the number of clementines you bought. If you buy many clementines, the chance of them surviving longer than usual is higher. 

How many clementines in a 3 lb bag, or how many clementines in a 5 pound bag? Despite how fresh they were when you first bought them, do not consume clementines after one week of storing them at room temperature since they will turn out to lose flavor and have shriveled.

So, clementines can last at room temperature for 2-7 days depending on how fresh they were when you bought them. If you want to know how to ripen clementines, leaving them at room temperature is a first great start also.

How Long Do Clementines Last In Refrigerator

If you want your clementines to last for 1-3 weeks, the best way is to store them in the refrigerator. Like other citrus fruits, clementines tend to last longer and stay fresher when they are stored at cold temperatures.

As a result, the consistent coolness in any refrigerator makes up a perfect environment for clementines to last and stay fresh like new.

How Long Do Clementines Last In The Freezer

The last way and the most effective method in keeping clementines’ freshness maintained as long as possible is to put them in a freezer. You might be surprised by this information in the first place, but the longer clementines are properly stored at low temperatures, the fresher they can keep.

If clementines are stored in great freezing conditions, they will last for several months without being defected at all. Clementines that have remained frozen can be used without any problem later on, as long as you stored them properly and correctly.

How To Store Clementines So That They Extend Their Shelf Life?

1. Store At Room Temperature

Storing clementines in an open basket, a wire mesh container, or any opened container will allow the clementines to last without being defected. Remember that if you store clementines at room temperature, do not cover them or put them in sealed containers unless you want them to spoil faster.

If there is a blockage between the air and clementines, molds will appear soon, and your clementines are more likely to be rotten. If you cannot leave an open space for clementines, make sure to only cover them in half-full containers.

One more notice for you about storing clementines at room temperature is that you should keep them away from direct sunlight or any intense source of light/array. The particles in sunlight or color array can be fatal to clementines.

The best environment for them is a cool place that is away from sunlight and in low humidity. Remember that environmental factors such as sunlight, warmth, and humidity can cause clementines to ripen. Ensuring a good environment without these factors will help you to access fresh clementines in the end.

2. Store Using The Refrigerator

Throwing clementines in the refrigerator solely can be easy, but what if there is one more thing you keep doing to make them last even longer and fresher? Here’s a useful list of steps that you should know before you store clementines or any kind of fruit in the fridge.

Step 1: Put them in a mesh bag/plastic container

Before placing all clementines in the fridge, put them in a mesh bag so they can lock their moisture in more effectively, making them still juicy and fresh when taken out. You don’t have to close the bag entirely; simply closing them with a loose to prevent the fruits from spilling out is fine.

While the others may recommend you to wrap clementines and put them in plastic containers, putting them in a mesh bag tends to be a more efficient way as air can go in, making clementines breathable, therefore reducing the risks of having molds.

However, plastic containers are still a great choice if you don’t own a mesh bag. Consider those two containers and decide whether which one is more applicable to your needs.

Step 2: Place the fruit inside its correct place in the refrigerator

Every refrigerator has a specific drawer for storing fruits and vegetables. If you happen to not have any mesh bag or plastic container, all you have to do is place your clementines in that exact drawer.

In this drawer, the humidity level is different from the rest area. This difference is suitable for vegetables and fruits that need storage, so remember not to be too lazy or forgetful to leave your clementines outside that crisper drawer.

Step 3: Sort through the clementines each two/three days

To keep the clementines fresher and fresher every day, you have one manual thing to do: look through them each two/three days and sort out the fruits that tend to rotter or go bad. So, how to detect them?

  • If a clementine feels soft, you should consume it as soon as possible.
  • If a clementine appears to be rotten or having molds, you should discard it.

By doing this, you can prevent the risk of all your clementines going down by detecting the bad ones soon. For example, how many clementines in a pound? 10 perhaps.

Then if 6 rotten fruits having an odd smell come off when they go bad, it can transfer to the nearby 4 fresh fruits and make them go ill as well. So, if you want your clementines to last longer, check for the bad ones and immediately remove them.

3. Using The Freezer

Storing clementines in the freezer requires some unique techniques. But don’t worry, once you follow these tips, you can make clementines last for a lifetime!

First, you need to open the clementines by removing their peels and separating them into their natural segments. If you can, remove the membrane and the seeds as well.

To cleanly peel the clementines and prevent the outsider dusk and dirt, you need to rinse them under the water first and dry them with a clean towel.

Remember that if you have chosen to freeze clementines, opening them entirely is the best way to store them. That is one of the techniques to make store bought frosting better. You cannot put whole clementines in the freezer unless you want their flavor and appearance to be damaged.

Put the slice in a plastic container. Arrange the slice neatly in your chosen containers. Then, pour sugar syrup onto the surface of these clementine slices until the liquid covers them up.

Then, close the container and let it sit in the freezer. Your clementines can be safe for up to a year using this storing method.

Conclusion

And that’s everything you need to know about the question “How long do clementines last?” Clementines can last for a long time, being edible and fresh like new if and only if you provide them with proper storage methods.

Thank you for reading our article, and we will catch up with you soon on the next one!

Kevin Richard
 

Hi all! I’m Kevin. I spend plenty of time in the kitchen every day because I love cooking healthy and delicious foods for my family and friends. Cooking gives me a chance to be creative and fun. It’s also one of the most meaningful ways to express my love and take care of my little family.

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